Google CEO Sundar Pichai wants AI to be regulated

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai has urged the US and the European Union to coordinate and offer tools that can regulate the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology. Speaking at the technology conference in Brussels, the Alphabet Inc’s Chief Executive Officer said that western countries need not start it from scratch to regulate AI technology as already some rules were in place- needing just a review and re-tweak.

Pichai says that Google has released some open data sets which the developers can use while developing tools to detect fakes and other facial programming interfaces.

The reaction of the Chief of the internet juggernaut comes just after a month where speculations related to concerns on Facial recognition technology and deep fake videos and audio clips were put forward before US President Donald Trump for review.

And Google Pichai’s comments come just a week before the EU’s decision to legislate the use of AI technology in the healthcare and transport sectors.

After the event in Brussels, Pichai is also due to have a meeting with Margrethe Vestager who is a Chief responsible to impose an anti-trust penalty of 8 billion Euros on Google. The meeting is expected to discuss all issues related to EU data privacy and the fines imposed by the watchdog on Google so far.

In separate news, let’s discuss the penalties imposed by the EU on companies involved in data breaches after tougher data privacy GDPR laws kicked in mid-2018. A report compiled and delivered by law firm DLA Piper, EU regulators have so far imposed $114M in fines for data breaches- which strictly varies from country to country.

The single biggest fine imposed by the data regulatory authority happens to be $50 million Euros against Google while Netherlands, Britain, and Germany follow.

GDPR which abbreviates to General Data Protection Regulation was introduced by Europe in May’18 to safeguard sensitive info of online users. And the law suggests imposture of heavy fines on companies that show laxity in protecting the data of their respective users.